Workers’ compensation laws can be tricky to pin down. There are drastically different laws in Louisiana concerning workers’ comp depending on whether you are an actual employee or an independent contractor.

The law also becomes murky when trying to determine whether an injury occurred at work. Many people have jobs that put them at risk of vision issues. Eye problems can severely impact a person’s life, and if it occurred at work, then that person should pursue compensation.

How do vision problems occur?

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health found that roughly 2,000 workers in the United States suffer from eye injuries every day. These problems can come from a variety of sources. Foreign contaminants can enter the eye. Everything from shards of glass to projected metal flakes can scratch the cornea or cause another form of irritation. A person can also receive overexposure to ultraviolet rays and chemicals, which can lead to serious burns. However, one source of vision damage that employees should not overlook is excessive computer usage. This extended exposure can lead to fatigue, nausea, migraine headaches and dizziness over time.

What are the symptoms of eye issues?

It may not be readily apparent that something is wrong with your vision until after the incident already occurred. You may suffer from changes in your vision and feel as though something is constantly touching your eye. Swelling sometimes occurs around the eye socket, and you will have increased sensitivity to bright lights. Any of these offer a good enough reason to involve your employer to pursue a workers’ compensation claim.

Can you file for a repetitive stress injury?

Computer vision syndrome is a serious complication that can occur due to prolonged computer usage. It could take months or years to develop, and you can file a workers’ comp claim for such injuries. You will need to show your injury occurred as a result of the actions you took while working.